Category Archives: Christeros

C.S. Lewis on “Xmas” vs. Christmas

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I have always been amused at this satirical story by the great C.S. Lewis about the difference between the world’s celebration of “Xmas” compared to the genuine Christian celebration of Christmas. Equally impressive to Lewis’ wit may be his ability to predict the future. Who can deny that Lewis’ short story, written well over a half-century ago in a significantly less modern commercial era, almost perfectly describes the universal customs of today’s world? Good Christians have a great duty to help the world return to a true celebration of Christmas.

The short introduction preceding the poem is taken from sspx.org.

 

“Does it often seem that there is a dual observance of Christmas, religious and secular, the latter hardly being related to the former? C.S. Lewis satirically wrote about this schizophrenic mentality that pervades modern society.

C.S. Lewis, author of the well-known children’s Chronicles of Narnia series, wrote this satirical story from the view of the ancient Greek historian, Herodotus. Note the clever use of the terms “Niatrib” (“Britain” spelled backwards) and “Exmas” (for “ex-Christmas” or “without Christmas”).

“Xmas and Christmas: A Lost Chapter from Herodotus,” by C.S. Lewis

And beyond this there lies in the ocean, turned towards the west and north, the island of Niatirb which Hecataeus indeed declares to be the same size and shape as Sicily, but it is larger, though in calling it triangular a man would not miss the mark. It is densely inhabited by men who wear clothes not very different from the other barbarians who occupy the north western parts of Europe though they do not agree with them in language. These islanders, surpassing all the men of whom we know in patience and endurance, use the following customs.

In the middle of winter when fogs and rains most abound they have a great festival which they call Exmas and for fifty days they prepare for it in the fashion I shall describe. First of all, every citizen is obliged to send to each of his friends and relations a square piece of hard paper stamped with a picture, which in their speech is called an Exmas-card. But the pictures represent birds sitting on branches, or trees with a dark green prickly leaf, or else men in such garments as the Niatirbians believe that their ancestors wore two hundred years ago riding in coaches such as their ancestors used, or houses with snow on their roofs. And the Niatirbians are unwilling to say what these pictures have to do with the festival; guarding (as I suppose) some sacred mystery. And because all men must send these cards the marketplace is filled with the crowd of those buying them, so that there is great labour and weariness.

But having bought as many as they suppose to be sufficient, they return to their houses and find there the like cards which others have sent to them. And when they find cards from any to whom they also have sent cards, they throw them away and give thanks to the gods that this labour at least is over for another year. But when they find cards from any to whom they have not sent, then they beat their breasts and wail and utter curses against the sender; and, having sufficiently lamented their misfortune, they put on their boots again and go out into the fog and rain and buy a card for him also. And let this account suffice about Exmas-cards.

They also send gifts to one another, suffering the same things about the gifts as about the cards, or even worse. For every citizen has to guess the value of the gift which every friend will send to him so that he may send one of equal value, whether he can afford it or not. And they buy as gifts for one another such things as no man ever bought for himself. For the sellers, understanding the custom, put forth all kinds of trumpery, and whatever, being useless and ridiculous, they have been unable to sell throughout the year they now sell as an Exmas gift. And though the Niatirbians profess themselves to lack sufficient necessary things, such as metal, leather, wood and paper, yet an incredible quantity of these things is wasted every year, being made into the gifts.

But during these fifty days the oldest, poorest, and most miserable of the citizens put on false beards and red robes and walk about the market-place; being disguised (in my opinion) as Cronos. And the sellers of gifts no less than the purchaser’s become pale and weary, because of the crowds and the fog, so that any man who came into a Niatirbian city at this season would think some great public calamity had fallen on Niatirb. This fifty days of preparation is called in their barbarian speech the Exmas Rush.

But when the day of the festival comes, then most of the citizens, being exhausted with the Rush, lie in bed till noon. But in the evening they eat five times as much supper as on other days and, crowning themselves with crowns of paper, they become intoxicated. And on the day after Exmas they are very grave, being internally disordered by the supper and the drinking and reckoning how much they have spent on gifts and on the wine. For wine is so dear among the Niatirbians that a man must swallow the worth of a talent before he is well intoxicated.

Such, then, are their customs about the Exmas. But the few among the Niatirbians have also a festival, separate and to themselves, called Crissmas, which is on the same day as Exmas. And those who keep Crissmas, doing the opposite to the majority of the Niatirbians, rise early on that day with shining faces and go before sunrise to certain temples where they partake of a sacred feast. And in most of the temples they set out images of a fair woman with a new-born Child on her knees and certain animals and shepherds adoring the Child. (The reason of these images is given in a certain sacred story which I know but do not repeat.)

But I myself conversed with a priest in one of these temples and asked him why they kept Crissmas on the same day as Exmas; for it appeared to me inconvenient. But the priest replied, “It is not lawful, O stranger, for us to change the date of Chrissmas, but would that Zeus would put it into the minds of the Niatirbians to keep Exmas at some other time or not to keep it at all. For Exmas and the Rush distract the minds even of the few from sacred things. And we indeed are glad that men should make merry at Crissmas; but in Exmas there is no merriment left.” And when I asked him why they endured the Rush, he replied, “It is, O Stranger, a racket”; using (as I suppose) the words of some oracle and speaking unintelligibly to me (for a racket is an instrument which the barbarians use in a game called tennis).

But what Hecataeus says, that Exmas and Crissmas are the same, is not credible. For first, the pictures which are stamped on the Exmas-cards have nothing to do with the sacred story which the priests tell about Crissmas. And secondly, the most part of the Niatirbians, not believing the religion of the few, nevertheless send the gifts and cards and participate in the Rush and drink, wearing paper caps. But it is not likely that men, even being barbarians, should suffer so many and great things in honour of a god they do not believe in. And now, enough about Niatirb.

Such, then, are their customs about the Exmas. But the few among the Niatirbians have also a festival, separate and to themselves, called Crissmas, which is on the same day as Exmas. And those who keep Crissmas, doing the opposite to the majority of the Niatirbians, rise early on that day with shining faces and go before sunrise to certain temples where they partake of a sacred feast. And in most of the temples they set out images of a fair woman with a new-born Child on her knees and certain animals and shepherds adoring the Child. (The reason of these images is given in a certain sacred story which I know but do not repeat.)

But I myself conversed with a priest in one of these temples and asked him why they kept Crissmas on the same day as Exmas; for it appeared to me inconvenient. But the priest replied, “It is not lawful, O stranger, for us to change the date of Chrissmas, but would that Zeus would put it into the minds of the Niatirbians to keep Exmas at some other time or not to keep it at all. For Exmas and the Rush distract the minds even of the few from sacred things. And we indeed are glad that men should make merry at Crissmas; but in Exmas there is no merriment left.” And when I asked him why they endured the Rush, he replied, “It is, O Stranger, a racket”; using (as I suppose) the words of some oracle and speaking unintelligibly to me (for a racket is an instrument which the barbarians use in a game called tennis).

But what Hecataeus says, that Exmas and Crissmas are the same, is not credible. For first, the pictures which are stamped on the Exmas-cards have nothing to do with the sacred story which the priests tell about Crissmas. And secondly, the most part of the Niatirbians, not believing the religion of the few, nevertheless send the gifts and cards and participate in the Rush and drink, wearing paper caps. But it is not likely that men, even being barbarians, should suffer so many and great things in honour of a god they do not believe in. And now, enough about Niatirb.”

~Steven C., “Knight of Tradition”

The noble serenity of a Catholic youth

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The following is the beautiful story of one of the lesser known martyrs of the Christeros. He was the beautiful example of a courageous and uncompromising Catholic youth, with great fervor, devotion and love for Christ and the Church.  May he be an example to today’s youth of Catholic tradition. Ora pro nobis, Luis Segura Vilchis!

~Damsel of the Faith

http://www.nobility.org/2016/09/22/luis-segura-vilchis

A hero model Catholic youth

SEPTEMBER 22, 2016

by Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

“Long live Christ the King!” Such was the cry that opened the gates of Heaven and eternal glory to many blessed during the Catholic resistance in the Mexico of the 30s.

The Cristero martyrs shouted it as they were executed by the communist regime they had fought: a tyrannical regime that shut down their churches, persecuted religion and spread disgrace over Mexico, the nation so loved by Our Lady of Guadalupe.

Luis Segura Vilchis also shouted it as he was shot to death by firing squad, with neither trial nor forewarning. The accusation against him: Having plotted against the life of the dictator Obregon.

In the photographs, we see the young engineer walking toward his place of execution. He is as serene as if he were walking up the aisle of a church for Holy Communion. Such is his serenity that we can easily picture him in former times about to receive the God for whom he is now to die.

Impressively pure, masculine and noble of countenance, well dressed, and visibly possessing good breeding, this hero can rightly be considered model Catholic youth; a youth that is serious, generous, and filled with faith and courage. How easily he could have used his many qualities in an egoistic way, building for himself a comfortable lifestyle with a smooth career! All he had to do was collaborate with the illegitimate regime or at least not oppose it. But the conscience of this devotee of the Holy Church could not accept such a thing. Segura Vilchis joined the Cristero movement, and thanks to his vigorous personality, fervor and intelligence he soon became one of its inspirers.

Witnesses attest that it was only as he was being removed from his prison cell that Segura Vilchis was informed of his imminent execution. He promptly responded that his killers would be sending him to Heaven. Even the captain and soldiers of the firing squad became moved on seeing him.

Led to the execution site by an officer, Vilchis had to walk by the still-warm corpse of Father Pro. In the pictures Vilchis is looking down to his right. There is the body of the famous priest.

 

Yet we do not note even the slightest contraction of Vilchis’ features. He shows no fear, no horror… nothing! His expression remains unchanged as he contemplates the stark reality so crudely presented before his eyes. He is its next victim, nevertheless the chroniclers of the time attest that they noticed no reaction. His self-control is total. It can only result from an extraordinary grace to face martyrdom and from a special strength of soul. His soul is strong because it prepared itself for this suffering long ago. Through hard reflection and meditation, it contemplated the worst that could come to pass.

Luis Segura Vilchis before the firing squad next to the body of Fr. Miguel Pro.

Contemporary man hates to prepare for the worst. He loves to dream of the best, to fantasize about an idyllic situation for himself where everything good happens and nothing evil interferes. He does this to avoid recognizing the importance of suffering for his sanctification.And what is the consequence? When the worst does occur, the person’s morale collapses. Young Vilchi’s did not. He was prepared for the cruelest reality, as these photographs prove. The sanctity of his martyrdom is enhanced by his heroic preparation.

“Gentlemen, I am ready!” said he as he faced his executioners and looked heavenward. Seconds later—and with what assurance!—he was entering another Heaven, of which ours is but a symbol. What glory is his as he is carried by the angels to the very throne of God for his encounter, his real encounter, with Christ the King, for whom he has just given his earthly life, and with Mary, who smiles sweetly upon this heroic son who during his entire life was such a faithful devotee!

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 543