Tag Archives: Holy Mass

Keep thy Priests

 

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“With all your soul, fear God, revere his priests. With all your strength, love your Creator, forsake not his ministers.”  ~Sirach 7:29-30

One of my favorite poems of all time is “Keep them, Dearest Lord,” a beautiful poem written for priests. I don’t know who wrote it. If anyone does, please comment below and let me know. I’ve always had a great devotion to the Priesthood and praying for priests. My trinity of devotions include the Holy Eucharist, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and the Catholic Priesthood, for these three are equally the foundation of the Church. Without one, we cannot have the other and without all three, the Church would lost her supernaturality.  Hence, why satan has attacked these three so viciously and continues to do, for He knows that Christ gave the Church the means of salvation through the Priest, who offers the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass for us, the Victim and fruit of that Sacrifice being the Holy Eucharist, the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ.

Let us love our priests and pray for them. I dedicate this poem to my own pastor, Fr. Greig Gonzalez, SSPX.  May God love and bless him, for his untiring love and dedication to his flock.

Keep them, I pray Thee, Dearest Lord,
Keep them, for they are thine,
Thy priests whose lives burn out
Before Thy consecrated shrine.

Keep them, for they are in the world,
Though from the world apart;
When earthly pleasures tempt, allure,
Shelter them in Thy Heart.

Keep them, and comfort them in hours
Of loneliness and pain,
When all their life of sacrifice for souls
Seems but in vain.

Keep them, and O remember, Lord,
They have no one but Thee,
Yet, they have only human hearts,
With human frailty.

Keep them as spotless as the Host,
That daily they caress.
Their every thought and word and deed,
Deign, Dearest Lord, to bless.

IMPRIMATUR 

+Henry Joseph O’Leary, D.D., Archbishop of Edmonton

Mary, Mother of Priests, pray for Fr. Gonzalez and strengthen him! St. John Vianney, St. John Bosco and all patrons of priests, intercede for the Priests of God!

~Damsel of the Faith

“Honor God and respect the priest”  ~Sirach 7:31

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Hear Mass!

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Let us hear Mass as much as possible this Advent!  What a source of great graces, the greatest in the world, coming from the Supreme and Eternal Sacrifice of Jesus Christ, Our Lord.

From The Incredible Catholic Mass by Fr. Martin von Cochem:

In every Mass, not earthly riches, but celestial riches from Heaven are showered down on all who are present, and all who are free to possess themselves of them.  But what are the riches which drop down from above?  An
increase of divine grace, an increase of merit and virtue, an increase of eternal glory, celestial consolations, the divine blessing in temporal affairs, the pardon of venial sins, the remission of a great part of the temporal debt due to Divine Justice, a share in the infinite merits of Christ.  Grace and mercy, temporal welfare and eternal salvation – such is the heavenly dew which distills from above…….Wherefore, if on account of the slight trouble it costs us or the trifling pecuniary sacrifice it entails, we omit going to Mass on weekdays when we might do so, we are guilty of great folly
…..

…….The object and end of our existence upon earth is to praise the Divine Majesty according to His great glory.  This cannot be done better than by hearing Mass, for it is the most Sublime Sacrifice of praise……….We cannot bear fruit better than by hearing Mass in the state of grace, for it is the most perfect Sacrifice of satisfaction.  We daily stand exposed to the danger of falling into sin, of being overtaken by misfortune; we cannot guard against these perils better than by hearing Mass, for it is the most efficacious Propitiatory Sacrifice.  Death and the devil constantly dog our footsteps and lay in wait for us, desirous to snatch us away and precipitate us into hell; we cannot shield ourselves against their arrows better than by hearing Mass, for it is the surest protection against the evils that threaten us.  Finally, let us not forget that in the hour of death we shall be in some need of the Savior’s assistance; there is no better means of assuring ourselves of this than by hearing Mass devoutly, for have we not heard how Christ Himself gave to one of His servants the promise that he would send for his solace and support at his last moments as many blessed spirits as he had heard Masses with devotion during his lifetime?  Reflect upon these truths and resolve from henceforth to hear Mass, if possible every day.  

How great is the Holy Catholic Mass of All Time!

~Damsel of the Faith

The Perfect Mass

“Nicholas Wiseman was appointed as the first English cardinal and the first Archbishop of Westminster following the restoration of the Catholic hierarchy in England and Wales by Blessed Pius IX in 1850. This great pastor and scholar wrote, concerning the [‘Tridentine’] Mass that he celebrated each day of his priestly life: If we examine each prayer separately, it is perfect: perfect in construction, perfect in thought, and perfect in expression. If we consider the manner in which they are brought together, we are struck with the brevity of each, with the sudden but beautiful transitions, and the almost stanza-like effect, with which they succeed one another, forming a lyrical composition of surpassing beauty. If we take the entire service as a whole, it is constructed with the most admirable symmetry, proportioned in its parts with perfect judgment and so exquisitely arranged, as to excite and preserve an unbroken interest in the sacred action. No doubt, to give full force and value to this sacred rite, its entire ceremonial is to be considered. The assistants, with their noble vestments, the chant, the incense, the more varied ceremonies which belong to a solemn Mass, are all calculated to increase veneration and admiration. But still, the essential beauties remain, whether the holy rite be performed under the golden vault of St. Peter’s, or in a wretched wigwam, erected in haste by some poor savages for their missionary”   ~Michael Davies

Holy Thursday 2016

The Sacred Triduum begins.  Today Our Lord Jesus Christ gives us Himself in the Holy Eucharist by instituting the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and the Catholic Priesthood to continue His saving work. For Our Lord, His Love was so great that it wasn’t enough that He died a most gruesome and agonizing death for our eternal salvation, He also left us His very Self under the appearances of bread and wine.  To represent Him on earth, He left us the Priests to continue His everlasting Priesthood and to act in His Name. Let us give thanks to God for His great Love for us!

Meditation from Fr. Francis Xavier Weinger:

The Church observes the fast of Lent with the intention of preparing her children, in as perfect a manner as possible, for the glorious Easter-tide, that they may arise from a sinful, tepid, and imperfect state to a pure, holy, and even saintly life–a life most precious in the sight of the Lord. It is, therefore, the earnest wish of this most tender mother, that each of her children be penetrated with the greatest horror of sin, and, that every Christian, as he arises from the death of sin, shall also make fast the sepulcher of tepidity in which his soul has been for years, perhaps, buried. To this wish, and to the manner in which its realization can be accomplished, I will direct the attention of all whom I address during these three days of grace, asking them to consider with me the lives of three persons of whom Holy Scripture makes special mention in the history of the passion.

The first of the three is Judas, as he sat with the Lord at the Last Supper. Let us follow him until we behold him commit the dreadful crime which sealed his eternal ruin.

That the infinite merits of Christ may be effectually bestowed upon us, the first and most essential condition is, that we renounce sin entirely and forever, and thus, with hearts perfectly cleansed from the dust thereof, render ourselves worthy of the Table of the Lord, and thus, at this holy Easter-time, receive His precious Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity. A glance at Judas, the traitorous Apostle, will promote this condition of heart.

He is a mirror in which we may behold sin in all its depravity; in which every sinner, especially if he be a member of our Holy Church, may see reflected his own image, disfigured and distorted by the malignity of the crimes he has committed. This will be made clear to you today,–the day, upon which, in ages long gone by, our loving Saviour bequeathed to us His sacred Body and Blood.

O Mary, refuge of sinners, obtain for us a perfect knowledge of our sins and the grace of true repentance, that we may make a sincere confession of all our offenses against the law of God! I speak in the most holy name of Jesus, for the greater honor and glory of God!

Several circumstances conspired to render the sin of Judas so enormous, the first one of which was his exalted position. He had been selected from among the millions of men who had lived up to that period on earth, and who would live until the end of time, to be constantly in the society of Jesus. Oh, what an honor! In proportion to it, therefore, his fall was immeasurably great.

Another serious aggravation of his crime was his abuse of the graces bestowed upon him to fit him for his vocation as one of the twelve Apostles,–one of the favored few who, for three years and a half, enjoyed the privilege of walking with the Saviour of mankind. He had, therefore, before him the most perfect example of virtue; he heard all His admirable discourses; witnessed His many miracles; beheld even the body of Lazarus, already touched with the blight of decay, arise at the word of the Lord, and yet all this was without effect! Oh, what emptiness of heart! what an abuse of grace! For his sin there was no excuse!

The next aggravating circumstance was the terrible indifference of Judas. Christ, in order to watch over and rescue the soul of this ungrateful sinner, endeavored to win his love and awaken his interest by selecting him from the twelve Apostles as the one to whom He entrusted the care of His own temporal affairs and those of the other Apostles. As a mark of confidence, He gave into his charge the alms they received to procure the necessities of life. This gave him occasion to speak often with the Blessed Virgin Mary, who followed Jesus, with other holy women, to minister to the wants of the little band. And yet Judas remained cold and indifferent to all these proofs of the searching love of Christ for him. Unhappy wretch!

Thirdly, the sin of Judas was enormously aggravated by his astonishing obduracy. Even, though already guilty of the basest treason, he dared to place himself, with the rest of the Apostles, at the table of the Lord– the Last Supper! There Christ, elevating His voice, pronounced those awful words: “One of you is about to betray Me!” Awe-stricken, the disciples asked, in trembling tones: “Is it I, Lord?” Judas remained obdurate. And again the Son of God broke the deep silence, saying: “The Son of man indeed goeth, as it is written of Him: but woe to that man by whom He shall be betrayed; it were better for him if he had not been born.” Terrible sentence! Mighty enough to move the mountains to their very foundations, and to penetrate to the inmost recesses of the ocean caves! And still that obdurate heart remained untouched; nay, he even dared to ask: “Is it I?” Then the divine eyes of the dear Saviour rested with loving pity upon him, as He replied: “Thou hast said it!” Obdurate still, his heart closed to the softening influence of grace; he received the Body and Blood of Christ unworthily; and thus, for the first time, was the sacrilege of an unworthy communion committed, and in that moment Satan took possession of his heart!

Fourthly, the crime of Judas was enormously aggravated by the incredible baseness of the treason. To betray his Lord and Master–his Saviour, who had given him such testimonials of His love–for thirty pieces of silver, the price demanded for slaughtering a head of cattle!–Can more unprecedented baseness be imagined? The enemies of Christ would gladly have paid him ten, fifty, a hundred times more for his most abominable treason had he but asked it. And with what bold assurance did he perpetrate the crime! He kissed the Saviour–the token of friendship to become the signal of treason! What greater hypocrisy can be imagined!

The last and most terrible characteristic of the crime of Judas was that hardness of heart which, culminating in despair, condemned him on the very day of redemption, when Christ gave Himself a willing sacrifice to die that he and all sinners might enter eternal life. This miserable being, unable to bear the weight of his crime, perished by his own vile hand! Oh, horrible sin! Oh, incomprehensible atrocity! Yes, well might Christ declare that it were better for that man had he never been born.

O sinner, you who, while listening to my voice, endure the gnawings of that worm which never dies– the reproaches of a guilty conscience–do you not shudder at the picture of that monster who, chosen of Christ to be one of His dearest friends, betrayed his Lord, and then put an end to his own wretched life? He longed to escape from the night of despair which darkened his wretched life; but the refuge he found was the deepest, blackest pit in the abyss of hell! Oh, that the tree upon which the despairing suicide ended his days, and the halter which deprived him of his life, were here before you, that you might witness the agony and pain of the faithless Apostle who betrayed the innocent Jesus! What a mirror of sin in all its blackest deformity! What a hideous reflection is therein presented! Sinner, do you not recognize it as your own? Do you not find it a perfect representation of your iniquitous soul? And O! may the grace of God so touch your hearts tonight that you repent, and tears entirely blot out that hideous image!

Many of you have, perhaps, heard an anecdote connected with a celebrated painting of the “Last Supper.” One who had been a dear friend of the painter happened to offend him so deeply that the painter, in order to make him feel his wrath, in depicting the traitor Judas upon the canvass, gave to him the face of the friend whom he had loved so well. When the king, who had ordered the picture and was well aware of the recent enmity, first saw and examined it, he smiled, and, turning toward the knight, said: “Excellent, my lord; you are drawn to the very life!”–Yes, sinner, look at the picture of Judas; you, too, are drawn to the very life!

What increased the malignity of the sin of this traitorous Apostle was the sublimity of his election. Sinner, Christ has also chosen you from among the multitude of nations who have lived and are living still in the darkness of infidelity and heresy! You are a Catholic! Glorious dignity to which you have been elevated through the infinite mercy of God; and yet, through your own choice, by the commission of mortal sin, you became a child of Satan. Oh, what a deep and damning fall!

What also aggravated the guilt of Judas was his wanton abuse of the graces granted him by the Saviour, that he might live and die as became a worthy Apostle of the Lord. What a multitude of graces, O sinner, has not God bestowed upon you through your call to the true Church? With what frequent instructions and encouragement have you been favored! how many confessions and holy communions have been vouchsafed to you! how many holy masses have you heard! and yet these graces have yielded no fruit! Oh, fatal instability of the human heart!

The treachery of Judas was aggravated by the manner in which he abused the grace of God. Imitate him not; but pause before it is too late! Judas was coldly indifferent to that love which impelled the Son of God to go in search of him, that He might win a return of love. Sinner, you know how mercifully Divine Providence has followed you! how lovingly the Saviour has gone in quest of you! Take courage from the very fact of your having come hither tonight. It is an effect of the endearing love of the Good Shepherd, who longs to bring you once more to the protecting shelter of His fold. Oh, hide no longer; but meet that loving Guardian, and let Him guide you home.

What rendered the sin of Judas so terrible in its enormity was his shocking obduracy of heart. You, also, are guilty in this regard; for, although you have received all the graces with which he was favored, you have also been endowed with many which were never bestowed on him. Judge, therefore, whether his obduracy was greater than yours.

Furthermore, Judas never had an opportunity of approaching the Sacrament of Penance. You enjoy that privilege; yet, perhaps, for years you have looked upon it with cold indifference, if not contempt. It may be that you have allowed years to pass without making a confession; or that, when you have attempted to blot out the sins of your life, you have but added to the long list of your crimes the damning guilt of sacrilege. And why, O sinner, is this? Because your heart refuses to give up its darling passions, and you continue to commit the same offenses as of yore. Judas did not, of himself, petition for the Holy Communion; while you have presumed to challenge the priest to open the tabernacle and place the Sacred Host upon your guilty tongue, that you may drag the Body of our Lord into the mire of your heart. When the agony of despair drove Judas to hang himself, he knew not of the prayer that went up that day from the Sacred Heart of Jesus on the cross: “Father, forgive!” Neither had he the example of the millions who, for nineteen centuries, have been guilty of grievous sin, yet repented and found grace, as you have ever before your eyes, O faithless child of the Church!

Judas betrayed his Lord but once, and upon that very day the grace of God forsook him and he perished miserably, while for you Christ has waited for years; and oh, for His dear sake–for the love of Him who, for three and thirty years, suffered cold and hunger, contempt and derision, and, at last, a painful death on the cross–let Him not wait in vain!

The crime of Judas was increased by the unprecedented baseness of his selling his Divine Master for thirty pieces of silver; but is there not some sinner in this very Church whose darling passion is impurity? who would betray his Saviour for the gratification of the most shameful desires? Is there no drunkard listening to my words who, to gratify his depraved and vicious appetite for drink, would give, if not his own existence, why, then, the lives of his wife and little children? Yes, I say the lives of those whom he is bound to love and cherish, for he is slowly murdering them by his neglect! You, then, O drunkard, betray your Master for a price even more base than thirty pieces of silver! Yes, sinners, by your crimes–be they what they may–you have all betrayed Him over and over again for the basest considerations!

Judas betrayed the Son of man with a kiss–the token of friendship and love; and the faithless Catholic would fain pretend to be a friend–an adorer of Christ–while he crucifies Him by his interior life.

Judas yielded to despair and hanged himself; but, for the love of God and His blessed mother, I beseech you, poor sinners, let the resemblance between you and the wretched suicide stop before you yield to the temptation of despair! He forgot Mary! Had he hastened to her, and implored her to intercede with Jesus for him, she would, doubtless, have done so, and Judas would have been saved. Do not imitate him in this forgetfulness of Mary. Fly to her; throw yourselves at the feet of the Mother of Mercy and refuge of sinners. Judas did not hear the words of Christ upon the cross: ” Woman, behold thy Son; thy Child.” You, beloved Christians, who have yielded to the tempter’s voice, may listen to them in spirit and in faith.

O Mary, Mother of Mercy, grant to my fervent prayer a gracious answer, and obtain tonight for every Christian present here, who, listening to the tempter, has betrayed thy Son, the grace of sincere conversion, that in these days of grace he may be reconciled to God, and no longer be deaf to the voice of grace. Pray for him, O dearest Mother, that, when appalled at the weight of his sins, the demon of despair draws nigh, he may remember the dreadful fate of Judas, and fly for refuge to thy maternal love–the surest haven for all repentant souls. Amen!


“Now, there was leaning on Jesus’s bosom one of His disciples, whom Jesus loved.”–John xiii, 23.

 

We all know the four divisions of the day–midnight, day-break, noon, and eventide; and each of them is marked by a special divine fact which speaks in the most emphatic manner to the heart. At midnight Christ entered the world; He was born in a poor stable at Bethlehem; and in the birth of this little Infant we behold the coming of Him Who was the Expected and Desired of nations. At midday was raised aloft the cross by which He redeemed the world. At earliest dawn the Saviour, bursting the trammels of the grave, arose to life once more, and gave to the world a splendid proof of His divine power. But there remains an eventide, glorified indeed through the divine love of the Saviour, which led Him thereon to leave us the most precious, the most sweet, the most consolatory legacy that a God could bestow. It is the evening of Holy Thursday, when the Sacrifice of the New Law was instituted to bless the children of men.

Where is the Christian who can speak or even think of this evening without the most holy sentiments of love arising in his heart as the scene of the Holy Paschal Table, round which Jesus and His disciples were seated, rises up before his spiritual view? What mighty love was that which impelled the Son of God to institute this Most Holy Sacrament, that He might remain with us even to the consummation of the world! What a pledge of this faithful love! And, of all the Apostles, none more fully realized this than St. John, the disciple whom Jesus loved; and who, on that evening, enjoyed the privilege and happiness of being nearest the Lord at the Last Supper, and of leaning his head on the bosom of Jesus. In the whole course of his life St. John never forgot that evening. He styles himself the disciple whom Jesus loved, and to whom this great grace was granted; but gives us to understand that we also are permitted to participate therein in its plenitude, for he says expressly: “Those whom Jesus loved, He has loved until the end of time.”

Yes, we may all, through the grace of Holy Communion, not only rest on the bosom of our Lord, but receive Him into our hearts. That we may do so with the purity of soul and fervor of love which distinguished the communion of the beloved disciple, let us glance at him as he sat at the Paschal Table on this happy eve. O Mary, obtain for us some portion of that ardent love which inflamed the heart of the beloved disciple toward thy divine Son! I speak in the most holy name of Jesus, for the greater honor and glory of God!

To receive the Blessed Eucharist in as perfect a manner as St. John, depends, first, upon the preparation we make to approach the Table of the Lord; and, secondly, on the manner in which we make use of His presence in our hearts, rendering to Him our gratitude after the example of St. John.

But, alas! with too many Christians, the first requisite is wanting. Even in the time of St. Paul, as the Epistle for today asserts, many of the faithful did not make due preparation, so that there were frequently communions which, if not unworthy, yielded but little spiritual fruit. St. Paul writes: “Therefore many among us sleep, because they do not judge themselves, before they approach the Table of the Lord, whether they are worthy to receive His Body and Blood; “from which we are to understand that, even if they were not in a state of sin, the coldness of their hearts, and the little degree of fervor they evinced, prevented them from deriving the benefits and graces which were poured forth upon St. John after his fervent reception of the Body and Blood of Christ. I said: “Even if they were not in a state of sin;” but, of course, if the sin were mortal, such a communion would not only be ineffectual, but a fearful sacrilege.

That our reception of the Holy Communion, therefore, may be indeed like that of the beloved disciple, it suffices not that we are free from the guilt of mortal sin; but we must leave nothing undone to cleanse our souls from the dust of venial sins and deliberate imperfections.

The ceremonies attendant upon the institution of the Most Holy Sacrament, as described by St. John, are a proof of this. Jesus washes the feet of all His disciples; and our Lord’s answer to St. Peter shows that this act is emblematic of the removal of every defect and imperfection from the soul. Therefore, did St. Peter exclaim: “Lord, not only my feet, but also my hands and my head.” But even yet this is not the perfect preparation for Holy Communion. St. John was next to Jesus. This illustrates the ardor and fidelity with which he followed the Lord from the very moment he was called by Him. He was one of those three highly-favored Apostles who were permitted to be in the closest proximity to Jesus, and who enjoyed the privilege of beholding Jesus in His transfiguration on Mt. Tabor; and, even among those three, he was the only one who followed Him to Calvary, and beheld Him on the cross.

This feature in the life of St. John–“the disciple whom Jesus loved”–should awaken in us the desire and resolution to make the most earnest efforts to please God, and so become more and more like that Divine Model, and, like St. John, to be faithful unto death.

But the generality of Christians care not to follow the admonition of Christ: “Be ye perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect;” and here we can find the cause of so many tepid and fruitless communions. Should any one ask why we feel so little fear of venial sins and trifling imperfections, I would say: As the fervent love of St. John is wanting, so also are the hunger and thirst of his heart after sanctity, lacking in the hearts of many who go forward to receive the Body and Blood of Christ. Whosoever loveth truly, my dear brethren, avoids everything, great or little, that might grieve or offend the beloved object; and the more ardent the love, the more earnest the effort to please. St. Paul tells us, in the most explicit manner, that there is no communication between light and darkness, between Christ and Satan, between heaven and hell.

The very ceremonies made use of in the administration of Holy Communion show how essential to its worthy reception is a repentant heart; for the Church has prescribed that the “Confiteor” be recited aloud, so that every communicant may make another act of sorrow for the most venial imperfection which rests upon his soul before he opens his lips to welcome the Lord of heaven and earth into his heart. But what urges us on and strengthens us to emulate the saints in their zealous imitation of Jesus is love. “The love, of Christ urges us,” cries out the Apostle.

But many Christians are wanting in this divine virtue; and thus it became necessary to proclaim that precept, the very existence of which should be considered a reproach by the lukewarm children of the Church: “Thou shalt receive the Blessed Eucharist at least once a year.” O dearest Christians! the soul of a St. John, burning with ardent love for God, required no such command. He hungered and thirsted after that divine food as the heart panteth after the fountains of water. St. Catherine of Sienna, frequently said to her confessor: “Father, I am hungry.”

When this love consumes our hearts, the second condition necessary to receive all those graces and blessings, conferred by a worthy reception of Holy Communion, will not be wanting–thanksgiving. But if it be a sad truth that many approach the Table of the Lord without due preparation, it is equally to be lamented that a still greater number receive the Body of Christ and turn away without a word.

This was not the case with St. John. Judas received Holy Communion, and his soul was instantly enshrouded in the deepest gloom of a night wherein there glimmered not the faintest ray of hope; and, after having received it from the hands of the Lord Himself, he arose, and rested not until the purchase-money, for which he had betrayed the loving Redeemer, was clutched fast in his avaricious hand! What a contrast! St. John, absorbed in love and joy, can find no words to express his gratitude.

Yes, Judas is also a type of those who receive Holy Communion without a sigh of thanksgiving. With the cold hand of despair clutching his treacherous heart, he leaves the abode of love and peace, and rushes away to satisfy his greed for gold! Behold these models of a worthy and an unworthy communion, and consider well which one shall be your choice!

Yet Judas is not to serve merely as a warning to the unworthy communicant; but also to those who, after receiving, plunge directly into the stir of worldly affairs and schemes to increase their wealth. Alas, that temporal interests should so soon draw them away from Jesus! We may well be astonished, and exclaim, with St. John Chrysostom: “How can it be possible that Christ becomes so soon indifferent to you, that you can devote but a few brief moments to render to Him acts of adoration, praise, and thanksgiving for a grace so infinitely great, for a happiness so exquisite as to render man an object of envy even to the angels, and for which a lifetime of thanksgiving would not be sufficient!”

And if, my brethren, you again ask whence arises this neglect, I would again reply: From a want of that love which burned in the heart of St. John. Those who love, long to be with the object of their love. When blessed Armella, whose dearest joy it was to spend hours and hours before the Blessed Sacrament, even when she had not the happiness of receiving Holy Communion, was asked why she did so, replied: “Because I love.” And, beloved in Christ Jesus, by frequently visiting Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament we will grow ever in the love and knowledge of Him.

St. John knew and loved Him in a greater degree than the other Apostles, because he was always nearest Him; and, at the Last Supper, his resting-place was the Sacred Heart.

Obtain for us, therefore, we beseech thee, St. John, some faint reflection of the ardent fire of thy love, that we may, by lives modeled upon thy own, show our gratitude and love to God; and, when we approach the Table of the Lord, may we taste the happiness which filled thy heart when thou didst receive the Body and Blood of Christ. Then will we, while still on earth, already taste the bliss of heaven, to which celestial joy the Church refers when she prays: “Lord, grant that we may forever rejoice in the delight of Thy Divine Majesty, which a worthy reception of Thy Body and Blood will afford us even here below.”–Amen!

 

 

The true Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and the Priesthood of Our Lord Jesus Christ

The following beautiful sermon of Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre was given in the Austrian National Marian Shrine of Mariazell on September 8, 1975:

My dear brethren,

I regret that I am unable to speak to you in your own language, but you have an interpreter in the person of this seminarian who is with me and who is accustomed to translating for me.

I wish to thank Dr. Steinhart, who was so kind as to organize this pilgrimage, and I should like to thank as well the Reverend Fathers who have been so kind as to receive me. We should indeed have been happy to celebrate the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass with you, but God has asked this small sacrifice of us so that we may adore Him in His Blessed Sacrament. We shall ask of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary that we may adore Him with all our heart, with all our soul, with all our strength—for if there is today a sentiment in danger of disappearing from the hearts of men, it is indeed that of adoration. Adore Our Lord Jesus Christ—that is what we shall do during this hour of prayer, during this hour of adoration.

For what shall we especially pray? We shall pray to the Most Blessed Virgin Mary in this place of pilgrimage which you love and which is the heart of Austria, in this place of pilgrimage where the eminent Cardinal Mindszenty was recently buried, he who for us is an image of the Faith opposed to all the enemies of the Church and to those who want to tear from our hearts this Faith which is for us the promise of eternal life and without which a Catholic Christian cannot live. Thus, we shall also ask of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary, through the intercession of Cardinal Mindszenty, that she increase our Faith today in our hearts and in our souls, that we may truly be among those who are attached to the Creed of the Catholic Church and to the Catholic Priesthood.

The Most Blessed Virgin Mary is first and above all the Mother of the Eternal Priest.

Our Lord Jesus Christ was essentially Priest for eternity, Priest according to the Order of Melchisedech. The whole life of Our Lord Jesus Christ, His wholeraison d’etre, was to offer the Sacrifice of the Cross, to offer Himself on the Cross. This was the goal of the life of Our Lord Jesus Christ. All His life Our Lord Jesus Christ was haunted by this desire to ascend the Cross. How many times Our Lord said, “My hour is not yet come.” “My hour is coming.” “My hour is come.” Why? Because the hour of Our Lord Jesus Christ was the hour of His Sacrifice. When He ascended the Cross and offered His Sacrifice, He Himself said, “All is consummated—Consummatum est.” I have done My work. I have realized My desire; I have accomplished that for which I came on earth—to offer My sacrifice to God for the redemption of the sins of the world. This is why Our Lord came, and this is what the Most Blessed Virgin Mary teaches us. For the Virgin Mary is nothing other than the mirror of Our Lord Jesus Christ. In her heart there is no other name written, than the name of Jesus and of Jesus Crucified. The Most Blessed Virgin Mary accompanied Him everywhere, even to the Sacrifice of the Cross. She was present there as if to teach us that she had no dearer desire than to be with Our Lord on Calvary at the Sacrifice of the Cross.

This then is what she teaches us today, as always, in a special manner: to love the Sacrifice of the Cross; to see in Our Lord Jesus Christ Our Lord Jesus Christ Crucified. And consequently, we, too, should have this desire to participate in the Sacrifice of Our Lord, to unite ourselves to the Sacrifice of the Cross, that we may truly be Christians who offer themselves with Our Lord, who unite themselves to Him in His Sacrifice as victims with Him. Such is the true Christian; such is the Catholic.

It seems to me that the Virgin Mary, whom we find close to the Cross, Our Lady of Compassion, Our Lady Co-Redemptrix, invites each one of us, each human creature born into this world—she takes us by the hand, after a fashion, to lead us to Calvary, to give us to participate in the merits of Our Lord Jesus Christ. But how does she give us to participate in the merits of her Divine Son for the redemption of our sins? Through priests. Our Lord wished that we participate in the Sacrifice of the Cross, that we receive His merits, that our souls be washed of their sins through His Sacrifice continued by His priests. When He said to them at the Last Supper, “Do—Do this in memory of Me—Hoc facite in meam commemorationem“—Our Lord did not say, Repeat the account of My Supper, recall My sacrifice. He said “Facite“—perform this Sacrifice. Reproduce this Sacrifice; continue My sacrifice. “Hoc facite in meam commemorationem.”

And this is the whole difference between the Catholic doctrine, which has always been taught, and the Protestant doctrine. The Protestants forget—they do not want to know that Our Lord said, “Hoc facite“—Do this in memory of Me. They say only, “in meam commemorationem.” Remember Me. This they say who do not continue the Sacrifice of Our Lord Jesus Christ.

The Blessed Virgin Mary teaches us, with the Apostles, with Our Lord, that we must go to the altar with the priest to offer the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, and that by the mouth of the priest Our Lord truly returns on the altar as Victim present in the Holy Eucharist. It is to the Apostles that He said, “Hoc facite.” Thus we must ask of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary that we may have a profound faith in the Holy Sacrifice of the altar.

The Church cannot do without the Sacrifice of the Altar. Look at the beautiful churches, which have been constructed. A little while ago—the Reverend Father Abbot [the Benedictines have custody of the shrine—Ed] was telling me that this church, or at least the original church, dates back to the beginning of the 9th century. How many generations have come to this church of Mariazell to pray and to offer the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, to participate in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass offered by priests! The altar is the life of the Church, the altar of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

We should then have a profound faith in the action, which takes place on the altar by the mouth of the priest. When the priest pronounces the words of the Consecration, Our Lord, as on the Cross, returns on the altar to offer His Sacrifice, which is continued for the remission of our sins. This is the heart of the Mass; this is what the Most Blessed Virgin Mary teaches us, this is what the Apostles teach us.

You learned in your catechism that the sacrifice of the altar is a true sacrifice and that it differs from the sacrifice of the Cross only because the sacrifice of the Cross was bloody and the sacrifice of the Mass is unbloody. This is the only difference between the sacrifice of the Cross and the sacrifice of the altar. That is why we venerate the sacrifice of the altar. In Catholic doctrine, all is there. All is gathered together in this small and this immense reality of the Sacrifice of the Mass. For if there is a sacrifice, the victim must be present. There is no sacrifice if there is no victim present. Thus, Our Lord must be present because He offers Himself in sacrifice. Let us not say, then, that the Sacrifice of the Mass is simply a commemorative meal, a simple remembrance of what Our Lord did at the Last Supper. All that is a blasphemy against the doctrine of the Church, against that which Our Lord Jesus Christ did and which He wanted to do.

All that ruins the priesthood. The priest is not the president of a commemorative meal; he is not the one who presides at a meal table. The priest is he who performs the sacrifice. The priest is he who causes to descend upon the altar the victim who is present, really present on the altar. Thus you see the grandeur of the priest, who has need of a character to offer the sacrifice, who needs to be marked in his soul for all time—for all eternity—to offer this sacrifice. You see that he must keep his virginity, observe celibacy, because for him it is an extraordinary thing—to cause God to come from heaven to earth, to cause Our Lord Jesus Christ to come in the Holy Eucharist, by his words, by his lips. Thus one can understand why the priest is a virgin, why the priest does not marry, why he is a virgin like the Virgin Mary. This is why the priest is a celibate, and not because he is too busy with the concerns of his apostolate.

The whole grandeur of the Sacrifice of the Mass comes precisely from the fact that it is a real sacrifice, like the sacrifice of Calvary. This is what our ancestors always believed; this is what the Church has always believed. We cannot vary from this faith by one iota. If we vary, if we change the expressions, if we now say: we are offering a Eucharist, we are having a eucharistic meal, we are having a supper …then we are becoming Protestants. And we are losing the whole reality of the Catholic Church, which reposes on this truth. There is no more Catholic Church if there is no more Sacrifice of the Mass. There is no more Catholic Church if there is no more priest who has a character so that he may offer the Holy Sacrifice.

This is why these beautiful churches were constructed. It was not for a eucharistic meal. It is the Faith of the Catholic people, which caused these magnificent basilicas to be constructed throughout the world for the Sacrifice of Our Lord, which must be continued on the altar, and for the presence of the Divine Victim in which we participate in Holy Communion and with Whom we offer ourselves. This is the reality of the Sacrifice of the Mass. This is the reality of the priesthood.

This is also why the Faithful owe it to themselves to have an immense respect for the altar of God where the sacrifice is offered. And they should have this respect for the Eucharist where the Body and Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ are truly, really and substantially present. We shall never be respectful enough; we shall never adore the Holy Eucharist with a heart sufficiently respectful.

That is why it has been the custom of the Church for countless centuries to kneel down to receive the Holy Eucharist. It is prostrate on the ground that we ought to receive the Holy Eucharist, and not standing up. Are we the equals of Our Lord Jesus Christ? Is it not He who will come on the clouds of heaven to judge us? When we see Our Lord Jesus Christ, shall we not do like the Apostles of Thabor, who prostrated themselves on the ground from fear and admiration before the grandeur, the splendor of Our Lord Jesus Christ? Is it not the great shame of our age that we lack respect towards Our Lord Jesus Christ? Let us guard in our hearts and in our souls this spirit of adoration, this spirit of profound respect for Him Who created us, for Him Who redeemed us, for Him Who died on the Cross for our sins.

What de observe in the ten years since the end of the Council? We are obliged to observe, we cannot close our eyes, we must not close our eyes to the sad realities of our age, when priests themselves lose their faith in the priesthood, and no longer know what the Sacrifice of the Mass is. When priests even abandon their priesthood. The seminaries are empty. Why? Why are there no more vocations? Because men no longer know what the Sacrifice of the Mass is. Consequently, they can no longer define the priest. When the Sacrifice of the Mass is well defined, when it is known, when it is accepted as the Church has always taught, then vocations are numerous.

I have the evidence in my own seminary. I do nothing other than reaffirm the truths, which the Church has always affirmed. So these young men are attracted by the altar, by the Sacrifice of the Mass. What an extraordinary grace for a young man to ascend to the altar as the minister of Our Lord, to be another Christ, to offer the same sacrifice that Our Lord offered! There is nothing more beautiful, nothing more grand here below. Then it is worth the trouble to ascend to the altar, to abandon one’s family, to leave the world to ascend to the altar. But if all that no longer exists, there is no more reason for vocations. And that is why the seminaries are empty. Let there be a return to the true notions of the Faith and there will be vocations; but if men abandon these notions of the Faith, if they continue in the same line as the Church in the last ten years, soon all the seminaries will be up for sale and all the religious congregations will disappear.

For what is the grandeur and the beauty of the religious, man or woman? It is to offer himself or herself as a victim at the altar with Our Lord Jesus Christ. This is the life of the religious. If they no longer have this intention—”I offer myself publicly in the Church as victim with Our Lord; my whole life is offered with Our Lord”—then the religious life has no more sense. And that is why there are not more religious vocations. Let there be a return to this spirit of victim, of sacrifice and of union with Our Lord Jesus Christ at the altar, and then the vocations will flourish once again and will become numerous. There are vocations, the young desire to devote themselves—and they are as numerous in our age as they have been in every other. But let them be given true things, real things, that which the Church has always given, and then vocations will flourish once again.

Ah, how much I should like you to understand my dear brethren, why our seminary at Econe is filled with vocations, why these young men come to us—to continue the Catholic Church and for no other motive. And not to become Protestants! We refuse to become Protestants, to be modernists, to be progressives in the degree that these things are contrary to our Catholic truth, in the degree that these things have been condemned by the Popes for centuries and centuries. We refuse them! We want to remain Catholic. We want Catholic seminaries and Catholic priests—nothing else! Now, they want to forbid us to form Catholic priests, to have Catholic seminaries. These young men, if I send them to other seminaries, risk losing their Faith, and not only the Faith, but their morals as well. So I maintain a deep faith in Divine Providence. God cannot abandon His Church.

Our Lord wants Catholic priests as He Himself made them. The pope cannot not want Catholic priests. The Church cannot not want Catholic priests. That is why I am persuaded that we remain profoundly united to our Holy Father the Pope and to the Church. That which the Church has desired for twenty centuries the Pope cannot not desire. It is impossible. Thus it is altogether false to say that we risk becoming a sect or falling into schism. Far from it. None are more united than we to our Holy Father and to the Catholic Church.

We ask the Most Blessed Virgin Mary then, to guard the Catholic priesthood and to grant that it may continue. We shall ask that numerous graces of vocations and of attachment to the Church be given to those young men who desire to become priests. We shall pray in the course of this Rosary for the Church, for our Holy Father the Pope; that the seminaries may once again become true houses of formation of Catholic priests; that men and women religious may find once again the way of the truth; and that religious congregations may flourish anew and return to the Faith of Tradition, the Faith which has been taught for twenty centuries.

That is what we shall ask of the Most Blessed Virgin during the course of this prayer, for you need priests, many priests, holy priests. This is certainly what you desire, and what we shall pray for today, gathered around Our Lady of Mariazell. May God grant us the grace ever to have priests, holy priests.

In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

Timeless and eternal

Once there was a time when the Mass was one and the same everywhere in the Latin Rite.  One and the same in its language, movements and ceremonies.  It was timeless, unchangeable and eternal.  On this side of Heaven, it was the most beautiful and holy act of worship to Almighty God. It remains such, for the truth cannot change.  Pray that the Traditional Latin Mass is restored to all the churches of the world, for the honor and glory of God and the salvation of souls.

“It came forth out of the grand mind of the Church, and lifted us out of earth and out of self, and wrapped us round in a cloud of mystical sweetness and the sublimities of a more than angelic liturgy, and purified us almost without ourselves, and charmed us with celestial charming, so that our very senses seem to find vision, hearing, fragrance, taste and touch beyond what earth can give.”   ~Fr. Frederick Faber

“It would not be an exaggeration to describe this Missal as the most sublime product of Western civilization, more perfect in its balance, rich in its imagery, inspiring, consoling, instructive than even the most beautiful cathedral in Europe.”   ~Michael Davies

“If there is anything divine among man’s possessions which might excite the envy of the citizens of heaven (could they ever be swayed by such a passion), this is undoubtedly the Most Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, by means of which men, having before their eyes, and taking into their hand [referring here to priests] the very Creator of heaven and earth, experience, while still on earth, a certain anticipation of heaven. How keenly, then, must mortals strive to preserve and protect this inestimable privilege with all due worship and reverence, and be ever on their guard lest their negligence offend the angels who vie with them in eager adoration.”   ~Pope Urban VIII

“Three characteristics of which Our predecessor [Pope St.] Pius X spoke should adorn all liturgical services: sacredness, which abhors any profane influence; nobility, which true and genuine arts should serve and foster; and universality, which while safeguarding local and legitimate custom, reveals the Catholic unity of the Church.”   ~Pope Pius XII, “Mediator Dei”

“This was the only form of Mass which countless millions of Catholics throughout the nations and the centuries had known, and from which, together with a catalogue of saints too long even to begin listing, they drew the spiritual nourishment that gave meaning and purpose, consolation and inspiration to their existence. This was the form of Mass which the martyr-priests of England and Wales celebrated at the cost of their lives”   ~Michael Davies

“And whereas such is the nature of man, that, without external helps, he cannot easily be raised to the meditation of divine things; therefore has holy Mother Church instituted certain rites, to wit that certain things be pronounced in the mass in a low, and others in a louder, tone. She has likewise employed ceremonies, such as mystic benedictions, lights, incense, vestments, and many other things of this kind, derived from an apostolical discipline and tradition, whereby both the majesty of so great a sacrifice might be recommended, and the minds of the faithful be excited, by those visible signs of religion and piety, to the contemplation of those most sublime things which are hidden in this sacrifice [of the Mass].”   ~Council of Trent

External points to Eternal

Condemnation of the banality that is the Novus Ordo Mass:

“The proposition of the synod by which it shows itself eager to remove the cause through which, in part, there has been induced a forgetfulness of the principles relating to the order of the liturgy, “by recalling it (the liturgy) to a greater simplicity of rites, by expressing it in the vernacular language, by uttering it in a loud voice”; as if the present order of the liturgy, received and approved by the Church, had emanated in some part from the forgetfulness of the principles by which it should be regulated,–rash, offensive to pious ears, insulting to the Church, favorable to the charges of heretics against it.” ~Pope Pius VI

“And since the nature of man is such that he cannot without external means be raised easily to meditation on divine things, holy mother Church has instituted certain rites, namely, that some things in the mass be pronounced in a low tone and others in a louder tone. She has likewise, in accordance with apostolic discipline and tradition, made use of ceremonies, such as mystical blessings, lights, incense, vestments, and many other things of this kind, whereby both the majesty of so great a sacrifice might be emphasized and the minds of the faithful excited by those visible signs of religion and piety to the contemplation of those most sublime things which are hidden in this sacrifice.”   ~The Council of Trent

“These ceremonies which are used in the administration of the Sacraments, each of which we receive as delivered and entrusted to us through the hands of the fathers, must especially be retained and observed with great devotion.”   ~St. Peter Canisius

“That rule must be absolutely observed which states that, except for the most serious reasons and with the Apostolic See, no innovations are to be introduced into the holy rites of the liturgy.”   ~Pope Gregory XVI

“Beauty, like truth and goodness, is a reflection of the divine essence. The closer we come towards God, the closer we come to pure beauty, pure truth, and pure goodness. The Tridentine Mass [is] theocentric, it [is] focused not upon man but upon God. By consciously disassociating himself from his everyday life the ordinary worshipper sense[s] at least some intimations of immorality, however rudimentary.”    ~ Michael Davies

“And since it is fitting that holy things be administered in a holy manner, and this sacrifice is of all things the most holy, the Catholic Church, that it might be worthily and reverently offered and received, instituted the sacred canon many centuries ago, so free from all error, that it contains nothing in it which does not especially diffuse a certain sanctity and piety and raise up to God the minds of those who offer it. For this consists both of the words of God, and of the traditions of the apostles, and also of pious instructions of the holy Pontiffs.”   ~Council of Trent

“It would not be an exaggeration to describe this Missal as the most sublime product of Western civilization, more perfect in its balance, rich in its imagery, inspiring, consoling, instructive than even the most beautiful cathedral in Europe.”   ~ Michael Davies

“This rite of Mass gives the most perfect possible liturgical expression to the Eucharistic teaching of the Catholic Church”   ~Michael Davies

“To abandon a liturgical tradition which for four centuries stood as a sign and pledge of unity in worship, and to replace it with another liturgy which, due to the countless liberties it implicitly authorizes, cannot but be a sign of division – a liturgy which teems with insinuations or manifest errors against the integrity of the Catholic Faith – is, we feel bound in conscience to proclaim, an incalculable error.”   ~Cardinals Ottaviani & Bacci

The nature of God is such that he uses things of the senses to lead us to Him and things heavenly. Our Lord used a human body to reveal Himself to us and earthly things as matter for the Sacraments.  The solemnity of the Mass is a reflection of the Majesty of God, who is not earthly but heavenly and lives in the Kingdom of Heaven, with much solemnity and angels gathered around singing His praises for eternity.  To reduce the Catholic Religion to an earthly Protestant sect is to reduce God to the level of man and to strip Him of His glory.

~Damsel of the Faith